About

The Association of Film Commissioners International (AFCI) is a non-profit educational organization founded in 1975 to serve the growing needs of film and television production. The AFCI was initially formed by a small group of film commissioners who wanted to share information and learn from one another's experiences. Since then, the AFCI has expanded into a worldwide network of more than 300 commissions representing six continents. All are devoted to the business of facilitating film and television production activity which generates billions of dollars annually.

Events

The first major educational event hosted by the AFCI began in 1976 as Cineposium. Held annually, this program features professional development seminars designed to teach film commissioners about the management and processes unique to the film commission business.

In 1985, the AFCI partnered with the American Film Marketing Association to host Location Expo, the first on-location trade show for film and television production. This annual event, now Locations Show, continues to respond to the growing marketing needs of film commissions, and provides an unmatched forum for film commissioners to promote filming within their respective city, state, provinces, or countries—all in one venue in Los Angeles, Calif.

The Evolution of Film Commission Services

During the late 1940s, the first film commission was formed in the United States in response to the need for film companies to have a local government liaison who could coordinate police, state trooper, and highway patrols; road and highway departments; fire departments; park rangers and other essential municipal and government services for shooting a production on location.

According to AFCI archives, George White established the Moab Film Commission as an offshoot of the Moab Chamber of Commerce in 1949.

"In existence for 60 years, the Moab to Monument Valley Film Commission holds the title of the longest running film commission in North America."

"Utah Native George White saw the need for a film commission when John Ford had expressed such interest in the Moab and Monument Valley areas. Originating with Stagecoach in 1939, and filming Wagon Master ten years later, Mr. White officially established the Moab to Monument Valley Film Commission in 1949."

Vanity Fair also ran an article that talked about Harry Goulding being responsible for bringing Hollywood attention to Moab/Monument Valley. As a result of the rich filming history, the Moab area has an established crew base and ample production services capable of accommodating just about any project, large or small.

The Colorado Film Commission was the first "government-sanctioned" film commission in 1969. Karol Smith was the first official film commissioner. Colorado is recognized as the first AFCI film commission and, obviously, a charter member.

As more production companies began to look beyond the limits of a regular production center for realistic and varied locations, more cities and states began to see the need for production coordination liaison. They were also keenly aware of the economic benefits brought by film and video production companies to their areas.